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With or Without Net Neutrality, Business Can Deliver Fast Internet | @CloudExpo #Cloud

The Net Neutrality fight has been all over the news this year

The Net Neutrality fight has been all over the news this year with the latest installment on Net Neutrality coming in from T-Mobile. Private and public companies alike are tuned into to this continual saga to see how the eventual outcome will affect business and ultimately their online lives. But whether the FCC's recent ruling on Net Neutrality stands the test of time or not, there is a new technology that will provide customers fast, reliable Internet services at much lower costs than private business lines.

If you haven't heard T-Mobile's video plan has just tested this spring's FCC ruling that set the Net Neutrality rules, leaving the Internet open.

With this latest installment from business we can all be sure the Net Neutrality battle will surely not be settled for the foreseeable future. But regardless of what side of the fight you are on, or how it comes out in the end, businesses must still ensure that their most critical web-based services and applications, such as video streaming as is the case for T-Mobile, chat, conferencing, VoIP, online calling services, or virtual desktops run consistently, and perform well.

To get the fast and reliable network speeds that are required for bandwidth hungry services and applications, enterprises have traditionally purchased and operated private network lines, such as T1 lines, and effectively set up a private network between their branch offices and data centers. In fact, to make sure their customers have a high quality, reliable online experience for each service or application offered, they must utilize dedicated private lines for each one, significantly driving up the overall cost. Though necessary for many enterprises today, private lines are very expensive, costing $300 and more per month for minimal (1.5Mbps) speed. This can hinder the ability of many businesses to provide multiple demanding real-time, web-based services, or ensure performance of business-critical applications in their remote offices. This is especially true as many business critical applications are no longer hosted in the private data centers but are now in the public cloud.

Because of the high cost of private lines, and the migration of business applications to the cloud, using the Internet for enterprise applications is an attractive proposition to businesses. However, Internet solutions generally fail to perform adequately at the "business grade" level required to run critical services and applications reliably until today.

Turns out there is a new network overlay technology that can create a robust virtual network augmenting a company's traditional WAN, it's called SD-WAN (Software Defined Wide Area Networking). The short and long of it is that it provides businesses with the ability to get private network line performance using public broadband services, all at a much lower cost than private lines.

What does this have to do with the Net Neutrality fight?

Until you could truly create a virtual network with a technology like SD-WAN companies had two not-so-great choices: buy more fast private lines, or risk unacceptable performance using public broadband. Net Neutrality's fight is about whether companies will pay to provide customers with a faster lane for specific web-based services and applications. If a faster lane is permitted that might slow other applications down, making it even more difficult to provide acceptable performance over broadband. But now that shouldn't matter. They can take advantage of SD WAN technology to get faster Internet speed and reliability at a fraction of the cost of private lines, and the decision to speed up an application is with the customer using the SD-WAN technology, making the neutrality fight outcome irrelevant for most business.

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More Stories By Sanjay Uppal

Sanjay Uppal is the CEO and co-founder of VeloCloud where he leads the team that is working to Re-Invent WAN and transform how businesses connect. Prior to VeloCloud, he ran publicly traded OnMobile Global, serving as its President and COO. He also spent time at Citrix and through the acquisition he negotiated with Caymas where he was President and CEO. At Citrix, he defined the product strategy and go to market for the Access Management, Delivery Controller and WAN acceleration product lines. Prior, Sanjay served in executive roles at Webvan (Vice President of Engineering and Business Development) and at Hewlett-Packard where he initiated and rapidly grew Internet Infrastructure as a profitable new business for HP.

He holds an MS from Stanford University, an MS from the University of Wisconsin, and a BS in Electrical Engineering from The Indian Institute of Technology.

Sanjay is involved in the application of internet and mobile technology to solve energy problems in emerging countries. He also enjoys bicycling, running, gadgets, watching cult movies (The Big Lebowski), and gardening with his family.

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